Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority
HomeDownloadsDisclaimer
Search ION     
Division Information Licences and PermitsSLGA InformationFAQsContact Us


FAQs
Casinos:
How many casinos are there in Saskatchewan?
Who operates the six First Nations casinos?
Who operates Casinos Regina and Moose Jaw?
 
VLTs:
When was the VLT program started?
What’s the difference between VLTs and slot machines?
How many VLTs are there in Saskatchewan?
How much money do VLTs generate?
 
Charitable Gaming:
What does charitable gaming include?
Do all raffles need to be licensed?
Who is eligible for a charitable gaming licence?
How do I apply for a charitable gaming licence?
How can groups spend the money raised?
 
Texas Hold 'em/Monte Carlo:
Does SLGA licence Texas Hold ‘em/Monte Carlo events?
Who is eligible for Texas Hold ‘em/Monte Carlo licences?
How do I apply for a Texas Hold ’em or Monte Carlo licence?
How can I get more information about Texas Hold ‘em or Monte Carlo licences?
 
Charitable Gaming Grants:
What is the charitable gaming grant program?
Who is eligible for charitable gaming grants?
How do you apply for the grant?
When are the grant payments issued?
How can I get more information about these grants?
 
Liquor Outlets:
How many liquor outlets are there in the province?
Do all of these outlets sell the same products?
Why do alcohol prices vary by outlet?
What if I can’t find a particular product?
Does SLGA ship products?
Commercial Liquor Permits:
What is the process to get a commercial liquor permit?
What types of commercial permits are available and what are the fees?
How many people can there be in a liquor-permitted establishment?
Is there a minimum price a liquor-permitted establishment must charge?
 
Special Occasion Liquor Permits:
Do I need a permit to serve alcohol somewhere other than a commercial liquor establishment?
What types of permits are available?
What are my obligations and responsibilities?
Where can I buy the alcohol for my event?
Can I serve homemade beer and/or wine?
 
Gaming employee registration:
What is a Gaming Employee?
Why do I need to be registered by SLGA?
How do I become a Registered Gaming Employee?
 
Gaming supplier registration:
Who needs to register?
How does my business qualify to become a registered supplier?
Why does the supplier application require so much information?
Does SLGA investigate all businesses that apply?
What does it cost to register as a supplier?
 
Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Licensing Commission:
What if I disagree with a decision made by SLGA?
 
Horse racing:
Where does horse racing take place in Saskatchewan?
Who has to be licensed to participate in horse racing?
 
Social responsibility:
What social responsibility initiatives does SLGA participate in?
If I think I, or someone I know, has a gambling problem, what should I do?
How much is spent on problem gambling treatment and prevention?
 
Employment:
How can I find out more about employment opportunities with SLGA?
Top of page
 
Casinos:
How many casinos are there in Saskatchewan?
There are eight permanent casinos in Saskatchewan. The Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) operates casinos in North Battleford, Prince Albert, Yorkton, Swift Current on the White Bear First Nation near Carlyle and the Whitecap Dakota First Nation south of Saskatoon. The Saskatchewan Gaming Corporation (SGC) operates casinos in Regina and Moose Jaw.

Who operates the six First Nations casinos?
The six First Nations casinos are operated by the Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA):
  • Gold Eagle opened in February 1996 in North Battleford.
  • Northern Lights opened in March 1996 in Prince Albert.
  • Bear Claw opened in November 1996 on the White Bear First Nation.
  • Painted Hand opened in December 1996 in Yorkton.
  • Dakota Dunes opened in August 2007 on the Whitecap Dakota First Nation.
  • Living Sky opened in December 2008 in Swift Current.

In 2013-14, SIGA recorded a net profit of approximately $82.3 million. Net profits from SIGA casinos are divided as follows:

  • 50 per cent to the First Nations Trust;
  • 25 per cent to the Government’s General Revenue Fund; and
  • 25 per cent are directed to Community Development Corporations.

The First Nations Trust supports economic development, social development, justice, health, education, culture and other First Nations initiatives. The government's General Revenue Fund helps fund essential programs and services for all Saskatchewan people in areas such as highways, health care and education. Community Development Corporations support charities in and around the communities where these casinos are located.

Who operates casinos Regina and Moose Jaw?
Casinos Moose Jaw and Regina are operated by the Saskatchewan Gaming Corporation (SGC), a Treasury Board Crown corporation:
  • Casino Regina opened in January 1996.
  • Casino Moose Jaw opened in September 2002.

In 2013, SGC recorded a net profit of $41.1 million. (SGC's fiscal year end is December 31). Net profits from Casinos Regina and Moose Jaw are split, with 50 per cent of revenues retained by the government's General Revenue Fund, 25 per cent provided to the First Nations Trust and 25 per cent provided to the Community Initiatives Fund (CIF).

The government's General Revenue Fund helps fund essential programs and services for all Saskatchewan people in areas such as health, education and infrastructure. The First Nations Trust supports economic development, social development, justice, health, education, culture and other First Nations initiatives. The CIF distributes casino profits to many different community initiatives that benefit Saskatchewan people including exhibition associations and community groups for projects that enhance human development and community vitality. The fund is administered by an independent government appointed Board of Trustees and is accountable to government through Parks, Culture and Sport.

Top of page

VLTs:

When was the VLT program started?
The VLT program was initiated in 1993 at the request of the hospitality industry concerned that local businesses, especially in rural Saskatchewan, were being hurt by the Saskatchewan people going to play VLTs in neighboring jurisdictions. Introduction of the VLT program supported the rural communities by providing an additional form of entertainment for liquor permitted hotels and restaurants with a lounge endorsement.

VLTs can be located only in age-restricted liquor permitted establishments. There must be a minimum seating capacity of 30 seats in the age-restricted area to be eligible for VLTs. Participating sites have a minimum of three and maximum of 12 VLTs.

What’s the difference between VLTs and slot machines?
VLTs and slot machines are both considered electronic gaming devices. In Saskatchewan, VLTs are located in licensed bars and restaurants with a lounge endorsement and are ‘coin in, ticket out’ devices. Revenues from VLTs are split between government (85 per cent) and the site contractors (15 per cent). Slot machines are located at the provinces six SIGA casinos as well as Casinos Moose Jaw and Regina. Revenues from slot machines go to Saskatchewan First Nations, the government’s General Revenue Fund and to help support charitable causes.

How many VLTs are there in Saskatchewan?
As of March 31, 2014, there were 3,960 VLTs in 616 sites located in 303 communities. The cap for VLTs in Saskatchewan is 4,000 machines.

How much money do VLTs generate?
Provincial net income from VLTs were $175.6 million for 2013-14. Site contractor revenues were $35.9 million. The government’s net income from the VLT program goes toward funding essential programs and services provided to all communities in Saskatchewan, including health, education and infrastructure.

Top of page
 
Charitable Gaming:

What does charitable gaming include?
In Saskatchewan, licensed forms of charitable gaming include bingo, breakopen tickets, raffles, Texas Hold ‘em poker and Monte Carlo (mock casino) events.

Do all raffles need to be licensed?
Yes. The Criminal Code of Canada states that all gaming is illegal, unless it is licensed or operated by a government; and that licensing authorities in each province may only license charitable or religious organizations to raise funds through lottery schemes.

Who is eligible for a charitable gaming licence?
Charitable or religious organizations are eligible if proceeds are used for a charitable or religious object or purpose. See Eligibility for further information.

How do I apply for a charitable gaming licence?
SLGA issues licences for charitable gaming including: raffles, bingo, Texas Hold 'em poker, Monte Carlo events and breakopen tickets (commonly referred to as ‘Nevada’ tickets).
 
All applicants must completely fill out the application for the particular licence they wish to obtain. New applicants must also attach a copy of the organization’s incorporation papers, constitution, bylaws, and minutes of the formation meeting with the application.

Each organization is required to have a separate chequing account, with monthly returned cheques, that is for gaming revenue only. Organizations must deposit all gaming proceeds into this account.

How can groups spend the money raised?
Proceeds from gaming events must be used for a charitable or religious object or purpose as prescribed by section 207(1)(b) of the Criminal Code of Canada. The four categories of charitable purpose are:
  • relief of poverty;
  • advancement of education;
  • advancement of religion; and,
  • other purposes that are of broad community benefit as a whole.

Top of page

Texas Hold 'em/Monte Carlo:

Does SLGA licence Texas Hold ‘em/Monte Carlo events?
Texas Hold ‘em poker tournaments and Monte Carlo (mock casino) events are two forms of licensed charitable gaming in Saskatchewan.

Who is eligible for Texas Hold ‘em/Monte Carlo licences?
Texas Hold 'em and Monte Carlo licences are issued in accordance with Section 207(1)(b) of the Criminal Code, to charitable or religious organizations provided the proceeds from the lottery scheme are used for a charitable or religious object or purpose.

How do I apply for a Texas Hold ’em or Monte Carlo licence?
To apply for these licences, click here.
 
How can I get more information about Texas Hold ‘em or Monte Carlo licences?
For more information, please contact SLGA’s Charitable Gaming Branch at (306)787-5563 in Regina or toll-free at 1(800)667-7565.

Top of page
 

Charitable Gaming Grants:

What is the charitable gaming grant program?
The government provides charitable groups and organizations a grant equal to 25 per cent of the net revenues they raise from charitable gaming activities to a maximum of $100,000 annually.

Who is eligible for charitable gaming grants?
All charitable or religious groups/organizations licensed by SLGA under section 207(1)(b) of the Criminal Code to conduct bingo, breakopen ticket sales, raffles, Texas Hold ‘em poker and Monte Carlo (mock casino) events are eligible to receive the grant provided they are in good standing with SLGA.

How do you apply for the grant?
Charitable groups and organizations do not have to apply for the grants. Information for the grants will be obtained from their charitable gaming licence.

When are the grant payments issued?
Grants are issued quarterly by SLGA.

How can I get more information about these grants?
For more information, call (306)787-5563.

Top of page
 

Liquor Outlets:

How many liquor outlets are there in the province?
There are more than 700 liquor outlets across the province. SLGA operates 75 liquor stores in 60 communities across the province. In addition, SLGA has granted 185 small businesses in rural Saskatchewan a franchise to sell beverage alcohol on its behalf. There are also private liquor stores in Saskatoon and Regina as well as 449 off-sale outlets in Saskatchewan.

Do all of these outlets sell the same products?
SLGA liquor stores sell domestic and premium beer, wine and spirits; franchises sell a limited selection of specialty beer, as well as wine and spirits; off-sale outlets sell beer, as well as wine and spirits. Chilled domestic beer is only available at off-sale outlets.

Why do alcohol prices vary by outlet?
All beverage alcohol sold at SLGA liquor stores and franchises are subject to SLGA pricing. Off-sale retailers and Regina's private liquor store use an open pricing system and can adjust their prices as they choose.

What if I can’t find a particular product?
SLGA offers a special order service for customers looking for a specific product not available in provincial liquor stores. Please phone (306)787-6558 in Regina or toll free 1(877)298-5559 for more information.

Does SLGA ship products?
No. Within Saskatchewan, there are private companies licensed to deliver alcohol. SLGA does not ship products to individuals outside the province.

Top of page  
Commercial Liquor Permits:

What is the process to get a commercial liquor permit?
The first step in obtaining a liquor permit is to submit a letter of intent to SLGA indicating the type of permit requested, the location of the facility and the name of the applicant. SLGA will then send an application package, which will include all required forms and information pertaining to the application process.
 

Processing an application may take up to several months; applicants are advised to apply well in advance of their scheduled opening or takeover date.
 

SLGA requires that applicants submit a copy of the Certificate of Title, purchase agreement, lease agreement, or landlord/tenant agreement indicating the applicant's legal right to occupy the premise.

How many people can there be in a liquor-permitted establishment?
The capacity of any outlet depends on the square footage of the premise, and the space allocated for the bar, storage, and any amusements, such as pool tables. Capacity is determined using the National Fire Code of Canada standards.

Is there a minimum price a liquor-permitted establishment must
charge?
Liquor-permitted businesses must charge at least $2.25 per ounce of spirits and the same amount for bottled or canned beer (assuming 12 ounces per container). The minimum price for draught beer is $0.16 per ounce, and for wine the minimum price is $0.35 per ounce. All these prices include the Liquor Consumption Tax and GST.

What types of commercial permits are available and what are the fees?
Fees are calculated based on permit type and the location of the premise and range from $50 to $600 annually.
 
There is also a non-refundable application fee of $200 for each permit.

Endorsements on these permits (ex. off-sale, restaurant lounge) also have annual fees ranging from $25 to $350.
For more information, contact the Liquor Licensing Branch at 1(800) 667-7565 or (306) 787-5563.

Top of page

Special Occasion Liquor Permits:

Do I need a permit to serve alcohol somewhere other than a commercial liquor establishment?
Special occasion permits are required for anyone serving alcohol at a special event, such as a wedding, cabaret or fundraiser that is held in a location other than a private place. A permit is required regardless if alcohol is served free of charge or if it is sold.
For more information, contact the Liquor Licensing Branch at 1(800) 667-7565 or (306) 787-5563.

What types of permits are available?

SLGA offers several types of Special Occasion Permits for different occasions and circumstances. See Types of Permits for more information.


Most permits can be purchased at any SLGA liquor store, private store or franchise. Outdoor event permits and annual permits must be approved through SLGA’s head office in Regina. It’s important to apply for these permits well in advance of the function to allow sufficient time for processing. A minimum of 15 days in advance is recommended.

 

What are my obligations and responsibilities?

As the holder of a liquor permit, you must follow The Alcohol and Gaming Regulation Act, 1997 and the Alcohol Control Regulations, 2013, as well as the specific Terms and Conditions that apply to your permit.


As the permit holder, you may also be held liable should anyone at your event be injured. This includes during the event itself, as well as injuries that may occur after the event. For example, if a guest at the event becomes intoxicated and attempts to drive himself home, you may be held liable for any damages he causes to himself or other people.

Party Alcohol Liability Insurance is available from many Saskatchewan insurance brokers.

Where can I buy the alcohol for my event?
All alcohol served at the event must be purchased from a Saskatchewan liquor store, franchise, or off-sale establishment. “Bring Your Own” events are not permitted.

Anyone selling alcohol under a “sale” type permit will be charged a resale levy for the alcohol at the time of purchase. This is in lieu of collecting tax from guests on the selling price of each drink.

Non-alcoholic beverages must also be available for your guests.

Can I serve homemade beer and/or wine?
No homemade beverage alcohol of any kind is permitted at a function for which a special occasion permit is issued.

Top of page

Gaming employee registration:

What is a Gaming Employee?
A Gaming Employee is a person employed in a gaming-related capacity by a charitable gaming licensee, a gaming supplier, a casino or bingo association. Casino board members, key management employees and key persons designated by SLGA must also register as gaming employees. A person who works strictly as a volunteer and is not paid does not need to be registered.

Why do I need to be registered by SLGA?
Government legislation requires that all gaming employees be registered by SLGA. To qualify for registration as a Gaming Employee, you must satisfy SLGA that you possess good character and have suitable training and experience. When determining good character, SLGA will review all aspects of your personal, financial and criminal history while ensuring personal and private information is protected. In all cases, your potential employer must also certify that you will be provided with training that is necessary to do the job for which you are being hired.

How do I become a Registered Gaming Employee?
You cannot apply directly to SLGA for registration. You must first apply to a gaming establishment (casino, bingo hall, etc.) for work. If they decide to hire you, they will provide you with an application. Your employer will forward the completed application to SLGA. If you meet the criteria for registration, your application will be approved.

The registration fee is $25 per year. Certificates of Registration are good for up to three years unless an earlier date is stated on the Certificate. In most cases, the employer will be billed for the registration fees. It is up to the employer if they choose to recoup those fees from the employee.

If you are dissatisfied with the decision made by SLGA, you may appeal to the Liquor and Gaming Licensing Commission. The Commission is an independent body responsible for conducting hearings on registration appeals. For more information about the appeal process, call (306) 787-1746.

Top of page

Gaming supplier registration:

Who needs to register?

Any company that wishes to provide supplies and services to the gaming industry in Saskatchewan, regardless of whether they provide gaming or non-gaming supplies and services must register with SLGA, unless they qualify for an exemption.

SLGA exempts all providers of non-gaming supplies or services from registration except those supplying:

  • employees who work in the gaming area of a casino, or areas not normally open to the public, on an on-going basis without escort, such as cleaning or maintenance staff;
  • an influence on the layout or design of a casino, such as architects; or
  • financial services that are not otherwise regulated by the Government of Canada or the Government of Saskatchewan.

In addition, companies providing gaming supplies or services qualify for an exemption if:
  • the company’s business is regulated by the Government of Saskatchewan or Canada or an agency of either of those governments and the regulating body carries out due diligence investigations that are satisfactory to SLGA; or
  • the company is the member of a professional organization established by law to regulate its members.

SLGA reserves the right to require registration of a company that is otherwise exempt if SLGA believes it is in the public interest to do so.

How does my business qualify to become a registered supplier?

To qualify for registration as a supplier, you must be of good character, be capable of providing quality and suitable products and demonstrate financial responsibility. When determining whether a business is qualified, SLGA considers the business itself, its key people and other businesses and individuals that have direct contact with the business applying for registration.

A business and/or its key people must be financially stable with a history of financial solvency; be capable of providing supplies and services and demonstrate a level of skill, experience, knowledge and ability necessary to supply the supplies and services; be in compliance with provincial and federal tax laws; and, be of legal age to transact business in the gaming industry.


Supplier applications and Personal Disclosure forms must be completed and returned to SLGA. The supplier application will ask specific questions related to the business and the officers and directors of that business. You will need to submit personal and corporate financial information and other information describing your business.

Why does the supplier application require so much information?

The gaming industry is one of the most scrutinized businesses in North America, and gaming regulators such as SLGA are required by legislation to assess the honesty, integrity and financial soundness of suppliers wishing to do business in the Saskatchewan gaming industry. The questions asked are standard for gaming authorities in this industry.


Does SLGA investigate all businesses that apply?

Yes. The length of time needed to investigate a business will depend on the size of the business, the location of the offices, and the product and/or services offered and the number of its key people. An average investigation can take up to 90 days. SLGA will seek reimbursement of all reasonable costs it incurred in the investigation of the business and any of its key people.

What does it cost to register as a supplier?

The fee to register as a manufacturer and distributor of breakopen lottery tickets is $5,000 Canadian dollars. The fee to register all other suppliers is $500 Canadian dollars. However, in order to make registration affordable to small companies, SLGA has the discretion to waive the $500 fee in situations where it is anticipated that the supplier will do less than $10,000 worth of business in a year. The requirement to pay subsequent fees (for the remaining years of a registration) will be assessed on an annual basis and dependent on the amount of business conducted by the supplier in the previous 12 months of registration.

Top of page

Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Licensing Commission:
What if I disagree with a decision made by SLGA?
Any licensing party who disagrees with a SLGA decision has the right to apply to the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Licensing Commission (SLGLC) for an appeal. The SLGLC is an independent, quasi-judicial body which reviews SLGA decisions with respect to licensing, registration, cancellation and suspension issues.

Horse racing:

Where does horse racing take place in Saskatchewan?
Thoroughbred, standardbred and quarter horse racing all take place in Saskatchewan. Thoroughbreds are horses bred specifically for racing. Standardbreds are a breed of horse that participates in harness racing. Quarter horses are running horses that generally race a quarter mile or less.

Who has to be licensed to participate in horse racing?
Anyone who is directly involved in any capacity in racing must be licensed by SLGA (ex. owners, jockeys, association employees, stable employees). There is a $10 fee for the first category and $5 for each additional category. For example, if you are a horse owner, you pay $10 for an owner’s licence. If you also happen to be that horse’s trainer, you pay an additional $5 for the trainer's licence, and so on.

Top of page

Social responsibility:


What social responsibility initiatives does SLGA participate in?
SLGA provides guidance and support to various social responsibility initiatives. SLGA continues to maintain a role in anti-drinking and driving initiatives and initiatives aimed at educating the public on the dangers of serving alcohol during pregnancy. As well, SLGA continues to fund problem gambling prevention and treatment initiatives sponsored by Saskatchewan Health and continues to provide training for servers in establishments with video lottery terminals.

If I think I, or someone I know, has a gambling problem, what should I do?
Saskatchewan Health co-ordinates treatment, prevention and education services for problem gambling in co-operation with regional health authorities, community-based organizations, gaming industry representatives and community stakeholders. A range of programs, services and strategies focus on intervention and treatments services, prevention, and public information. Do not be afraid or embarrassed to ask for help. The Problem Gambling Help Line provides professional counseling as well as confidential referral and information services. Call toll-free at 1(800) 306-6789.

How much is spent on problem gambling treatment and prevention?
Organizations in Saskatchewan dedicate approximately $6.1 million for problem gambling prevention and treatment programs. 
Top of page

Employment:

How can I find out about employment opportunities with SLGA?
To apply for a position at a Saskatchewan liquor store, you can apply directly to the store where you would like to work. For a complete listing of SLGA stores click here.

As well, SLGA advertises head office positions on Saskatchewan's Public Service Commission Web site
www.careers.gov.sk.ca and/or in Saskatchewan's two major daily newspapers. To view SLGA's current employment opportunities click here.You are also welcome to forward your resume without waiting for a specific advertisement either by regular mail (2500 Victoria Avenue, Regina, Sask., S4P 3M3) or electronically.

Top of page







Home  Downloads  Disclaimer  Privacy Statement
Division Information  Annual Report  SLGA's Strategic Plan  Fact Sheets  News Releases  Social Responsibility  Gaming Agreement  Legislation  FAQs  Contact Us  Commercial Liquor Permits  Special Occasion Liquor Permits  Liquor Permit Sanctions  Charitable Gaming Licences  
LION Access (Clients Only)   Government of Saskatchewan  

©  Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority, 2011.